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La Via Campesina North America
Headquartered in Washington DC
vianorteamerica@gmail.com
(202) 543-5675
website
facebook
Who is La Via Campesina?
We are the international movement of peasants, small- and medium-sized producers, landless, rural women, indigenous people, rural youth and agricultural workers. We defend the values and the basic interests of our members. We are an autonomous, pluralist and multicultural movement, independent of any political, economic, or other type of affiliation. Our 148 members are from 69 countries from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas.
How was La Via Campesina created?
In May of 1993, the First Conference of La Via Campesina was held in Mons, Belgium, where it was constituted as a world organization, and its first strategic guidelines and structure were defined. The Second International Conference was held in 1996 in Tlaxcala, Mexico; the third in 2000 in Bangalore, India; and the fourth in 2004 in Sao Paolo, Brazil.
What is our main objective?
The principal objective of La Via Campesina is to develop solidarity and unity among small farmer organizations in order to promote gender parity and social justice in fair economic relations; the preservation of land, water, seeds and other natural resources; food sovereignty; sustainable agricultural production based on small and medium-sized producers.
What do we defend?
Peasant, family farm-based production
La Via Campesina promotes a model of peasant or family-farm agriculture based on sustainable production with local resources and in harmony with local culture and traditions. Peasants and farmers rely on a long experience with their locallyavailable resources. We are capable of producing the optimal quantity and quality of food with few external inputs. Our production is mainly for family consumption and domestic markets.
People’s food sovereignty
Food sovereignty is the RIGHT of peoples, countries, and state unions to define their agricultural and food policy without the “dumping” of agricultural commodities into foreign countries. Food sovereignty organizes food production and consumption according to the needs of local communities, giving priority to production for local consumption. Food sovereignty includes the right to protect and regulate the national agricultural and livestock production and to shield the domestic market from the dumping of agricultural surpluses and low-price imports from other countries. Landless people, peasants, and small farmers must get access to land, water, and seed as well as productive resources and adequate public services. Food sovereignty and sustainability are a higher priority than trade policies.
Decentralized food production and supply chains
The current industrialized agribusiness model has been deliberately planned for the complete vertical integration and to dominate all agriculture activities. This model exploits workers and concentrates economic and political power. La Via Campesina advocates a decentralized model where production, processing, distribution and consumption are controlled by the people the communities themselves and not by transnational corporations.
Events
To globalize the struggle against injustice and neoliberalism worldwide, La Via Campesina has two important dates: 1. 17th of April: The international peasant struggle day People all around the world will commemorate the killing of 19 peasants struggling for land reform in Eldorado dos Carajas (Brazil) on April 17, 1996.

La Via Campesina North America

Headquartered in Washington DC

vianorteamerica@gmail.com

(202) 543-5675

website

facebook

Who is La Via Campesina?

We are the international movement of peasants, small- and medium-sized producers, landless, rural women, indigenous people, rural youth and agricultural workers. We defend the values and the basic interests of our members. We are an autonomous, pluralist and multicultural movement, independent of any political, economic, or other type of affiliation. Our 148 members are from 69 countries from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

How was La Via Campesina created?

In May of 1993, the First Conference of La Via Campesina was held in Mons, Belgium, where it was constituted as a world organization, and its first strategic guidelines and structure were defined. The Second International Conference was held in 1996 in Tlaxcala, Mexico; the third in 2000 in Bangalore, India; and the fourth in 2004 in Sao Paolo, Brazil.

What is our main objective?

The principal objective of La Via Campesina is to develop solidarity and unity among small farmer organizations in order to promote gender parity and social justice in fair economic relations; the preservation of land, water, seeds and other natural resources; food sovereignty; sustainable agricultural production based on small and medium-sized producers.

What do we defend?

Peasant, family farm-based production

La Via Campesina promotes a model of peasant or family-farm agriculture based on sustainable production with local resources and in harmony with local culture and traditions. Peasants and farmers rely on a long experience with their locallyavailable resources. We are capable of producing the optimal quantity and quality of food with few external inputs. Our production is mainly for family consumption and domestic markets.

People’s food sovereignty

Food sovereignty is the RIGHT of peoples, countries, and state unions to define their agricultural and food policy without the “dumping” of agricultural commodities into foreign countries. Food sovereignty organizes food production and consumption according to the needs of local communities, giving priority to production for local consumption. Food sovereignty includes the right to protect and regulate the national agricultural and livestock production and to shield the domestic market from the dumping of agricultural surpluses and low-price imports from other countries. Landless people, peasants, and small farmers must get access to land, water, and seed as well as productive resources and adequate public services. Food sovereignty and sustainability are a higher priority than trade policies.

Decentralized food production and supply chains

The current industrialized agribusiness model has been deliberately planned for the complete vertical integration and to dominate all agriculture activities. This model exploits workers and concentrates economic and political power. La Via Campesina advocates a decentralized model where production, processing, distribution and consumption are controlled by the people the communities themselves and not by transnational corporations.

Events

To globalize the struggle against injustice and neoliberalism worldwide, La Via Campesina has two important dates: 1. 17th of April: The international peasant struggle day People all around the world will commemorate the killing of 19 peasants struggling for land reform in Eldorado dos Carajas (Brazil) on April 17, 1996.

Fork + Frame
Seattle, WA
info@forkandframe.com
website
facebook
at fork + frame, we think bicycles are rad. we love to grub on fresh produce. and we are firmly rooted in our pursuit of food justice.
one night, we put our thinking caps on and came up with an idea: let’s work with a local farm to provide the first bike powered csa delivery service in seattle.
to us, it only came natural to collaborate with clean greens farm on this joint venture: we’re both rooted in the central district and we’re both are passionate about providing healthy, affordable food within the neighborhood we call home (plus, we’re all incredibly gorgeous).
we stand behind the mission of clean greens. we stand behind the use of bicycles within the city as an alternative mode of transportation. and pretty soon, we can be standing behind your door, with a fresh box of nom noms in tow.

Fork + Frame

Seattle, WA

info@forkandframe.com

website

facebook

at fork + frame, we think bicycles are rad. we love to grub on fresh produce. and we are firmly rooted in our pursuit of food justice.

one night, we put our thinking caps on and came up with an idea: let’s work with a local farm to provide the first bike powered csa delivery service in seattle.

to us, it only came natural to collaborate with clean greens farm on this joint venture: we’re both rooted in the central district and we’re both are passionate about providing healthy, affordable food within the neighborhood we call home (plus, we’re all incredibly gorgeous).

we stand behind the mission of clean greens. we stand behind the use of bicycles within the city as an alternative mode of transportation. and pretty soon, we can be standing behind your door, with a fresh box of nom noms in tow.

The Just Garden Project
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, suite 100,
Seattle, WA 98103
food@justgarden.org
(206) 708-9913
website
facebook
Mission
The Just Garden Projectis a grassroots organization dedicated to building a just food system and a culture of gardening for all people. We do this by building gardens, celebrating our community, educating new gardeners and training youth to take an active role in this transformation.
We are fiscally sponsored by Seattle Tilth.
Free/Subsidized Gardens
JGP builds free/subsidized gardensfor low income families in their homes. Each garden comes with 3 raised beds,soil, seeds, starts, a growing guide and a mentor. These gardens provide familiesand communities with self-sufficient access to highly nutritious, organic food.
Education
Through our mentor program, the Just Garden Project pairs new and seasoned gardeners. Mentors help new gardeners maximize their growing space and help them experience success in their first years of gardening.
Youth Engagement
Our work continues only if the next generations believe it is important. Partnering with existing youth organizations we educate and engage youth in the movement for just, healthy and thriving food systems. We engage youth in building gardens, visioning their food system and spreading the word about food justice.
Community Celebrations
How and what we celebrate says something about who we are. JGP organizes community celebrations around gardening. Throughout the year the
Just Garden Project has 4 main celebrations:
Our Launch Party
Spring Into Bed
Fall Into Bed
A Thanksgiving Feast

The Just Garden Project

4649 Sunnyside Ave N, suite 100,

Seattle, WA 98103

food@justgarden.org

(206) 708-9913

website

facebook

Mission

The Just Garden Projectis a grassroots organization dedicated to building a just food system and a culture of gardening for all people. We do this by building gardens, celebrating our community, educating new gardeners and training youth to take an active role in this transformation.

We are fiscally sponsored by Seattle Tilth.

Free/Subsidized Gardens

JGP builds free/subsidized gardensfor low income families in their homes. Each garden comes with 3 raised beds,soil, seeds, starts, a growing guide and a mentor. These gardens provide familiesand communities with self-sufficient access to highly nutritious, organic food.

Education

Through our mentor program, the Just Garden Project pairs new and seasoned gardeners. Mentors help new gardeners maximize their growing space and help them experience success in their first years of gardening.

Youth Engagement

Our work continues only if the next generations believe it is important. Partnering with existing youth organizations we educate and engage youth in the movement for just, healthy and thriving food systems. We engage youth in building gardens, visioning their food system and spreading the word about food justice.

Community Celebrations

How and what we celebrate says something about who we are. JGP organizes community celebrations around gardening. Throughout the year the

Just Garden Project has 4 main celebrations:

  • Our Launch Party
  • Spring Into Bed
  • Fall Into Bed
  • A Thanksgiving Feast
Clean Greens Farm and Market
116 21st Ave,
Seattle, WA 98122
cleangreensfarmandmarket@gmail.com
(206) 323-0534
website
facebook
Clean Greens Farm and Market was established to supply fresh, wholesome produce to families in need in Seattle’s Central District and other communities. Some of these communities do not have access to healthy produce, and are located in what is known as food deserts. Most residents in these areas have a higher rate of poor diet related illnesses such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. The number of obesity cases is also on the rise. Our market is committed to delivering quality produce to those families who otherwise would not have access to it.
Founded in 2007 by Rev. Robert L. Jeffrey, Sr., Clean Greens helps to educate our communities on healthy eating and food justice. We also offer affordable produce with our CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. Through this program, all residents are able to purchase fresh produce directly from a local farmer. Produce is often harvested the same day it is delivered. Also, through this program, we are able to build partnerships and forge meaningful relationships throughout our city and abroad.
Clean Greens grew out of the Black Dollar Days Task Force.

Clean Greens Farm and Market

116 21st Ave,

Seattle, WA 98122

cleangreensfarmandmarket@gmail.com

(206) 323-0534

website

facebook

Clean Greens Farm and Market was established to supply fresh, wholesome produce to families in need in Seattle’s Central District and other communities. Some of these communities do not have access to healthy produce, and are located in what is known as food deserts. Most residents in these areas have a higher rate of poor diet related illnesses such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. The number of obesity cases is also on the rise. Our market is committed to delivering quality produce to those families who otherwise would not have access to it.

Founded in 2007 by Rev. Robert L. Jeffrey, Sr., Clean Greens helps to educate our communities on healthy eating and food justice. We also offer affordable produce with our CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. Through this program, all residents are able to purchase fresh produce directly from a local farmer. Produce is often harvested the same day it is delivered. Also, through this program, we are able to build partnerships and forge meaningful relationships throughout our city and abroad.

Clean Greens grew out of the Black Dollar Days Task Force.

Seattle Youth Garden Works
3501 NE 41st St,
Seattle, WA 98195
sygw@seattletilth.org
(206) 633-0451
website
facebook
Seattle Youth Garden Works empowers homeless and under-served youth through garden-based education and employment. We are a market gardening program for youth ages 14-22 in the University District and South Park neighborhoods. Our goals are to connect youth to housing, health care, education, jobs and community.
Stop by our booth at the U-District Farmers Market on Saturdays from 9am-2pm!
SYGW recently became joined forces with Seattle Tilth. It is also beginning a major site expansion in collaboration with the UW Farm.

Seattle Youth Garden Works

3501 NE 41st St,

Seattle, WA 98195

sygw@seattletilth.org

(206) 633-0451

website

facebook

Seattle Youth Garden Works empowers homeless and under-served youth through garden-based education and employment. We are a market gardening program for youth ages 14-22 in the University District and South Park neighborhoods. Our goals are to connect youth to housing, health care, education, jobs and community.

Stop by our booth at the U-District Farmers Market on Saturdays from 9am-2pm!

SYGW recently became joined forces with Seattle Tilth. It is also beginning a major site expansion in collaboration with the UW Farm.

UW Student Food Cooperative
Seattle, WA
info@uwsfc.com
website / blog
facebook
We are building a student food cooperative whose purpose is to achieve food sovereignty on campus and address food justice issues through the affordable provision of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods that are ethically and sustainably grown and produced as well as locally sourced.
As a student run food cooperative working in tangent with the campus farm, students will engage with a localized and contextualized food system on campus through projects such as a bulk buying club, the farm itself, a CSA program, and the operation of the cooperative for food credit. Our initial ambition is to operate out of a small underutilized and little trafficked café space in the south of campus and sell prepared foods through a food cart on central campus.
Goals
Provide “real” food to students
Decrease the costs of food for students
Help educate students about the importance of their food choices and of the politics be-hind their food choices
Engender a culture of sustainability onto the UW campus
Promote the UW Farm and other local food producers practicing sustainable farming practices.
Enrich students with management skills in an enterprise where ethics, the environment, and social responsibility take precedence.
Provide educational opportunities around health and nutrition, sustainable food systems and global trade.
The Model
By decreasing overhead, the co-op incentivizes the eating of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods by making it affordable.
The produce used to make the food will be ethically and sustainably grown, produced and locally sourced.
The form of the cooperative will be a student run and operated café.
Organizational Structure
The organization will be governed and operated by existing students.
Student volunteers can take shifts at the co-op and will be compensated with food credit.
Commitment to Real Food and Sustainable Practices
We will use sustainable products through out the process of preparing the food and operating the cafe. We will facilitate a space for discussion and community around food and sustainable lifestyles.

UW Student Food Cooperative

Seattle, WA

info@uwsfc.com

website / blog

facebook

We are building a student food cooperative whose purpose is to achieve food sovereignty on campus and address food justice issues through the affordable provision of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods that are ethically and sustainably grown and produced as well as locally sourced.

As a student run food cooperative working in tangent with the campus farm, students will engage with a localized and contextualized food system on campus through projects such as a bulk buying club, the farm itself, a CSA program, and the operation of the cooperative for food credit. Our initial ambition is to operate out of a small underutilized and little trafficked café space in the south of campus and sell prepared foods through a food cart on central campus.

Goals

  • Provide “real” food to students
  • Decrease the costs of food for students
  • Help educate students about the importance of their food choices and of the politics be-hind their food choices
  • Engender a culture of sustainability onto the UW campus
  • Promote the UW Farm and other local food producers practicing sustainable farming practices.
  • Enrich students with management skills in an enterprise where ethics, the environment, and social responsibility take precedence.
  • Provide educational opportunities around health and nutrition, sustainable food systems and global trade.

The Model

  • By decreasing overhead, the co-op incentivizes the eating of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods by making it affordable.
  • The produce used to make the food will be ethically and sustainably grown, produced and locally sourced.
  • The form of the cooperative will be a student run and operated café.

Organizational Structure

  • The organization will be governed and operated by existing students.
  • Student volunteers can take shifts at the co-op and will be compensated with food credit.

Commitment to Real Food and Sustainable Practices

We will use sustainable products through out the process of preparing the food and operating the cafe. We will facilitate a space for discussion and community around food and sustainable lifestyles.

Danny Woo Community Garden
Seattle, WA
info@interimicda.org
(206) 624-1802
website / blog
facebook


The Danny Woo International District Community Garden is a special urban park in the heart of downtown Seattle, and the largest green space in the Chinatown/International District. The 1.5-acre garden provides community gardening space, picnic benches, public art, and walking trails. InterIm CDA manages this urban space, coordinating hundreds of volunteers every year to maintain and improve the Danny Woo Garden for everyone to enjoy.The Danny Woo Garden is located on the corner of Maynard Ave. and Main St.
The steeply terraced garden, surrounded with the lush greenery of bamboo and trees, is home to more than 100 community garden plots. Here elderly Asian gardeners tend to vegetables rarely seen in the typical grocery store, but which reflect their native lands: bok choy, bittermelon, daikon, and watercress. And younger generations of community gardeners experiment with plum trees, strawberries, beans, and herbs.
Residents come to plant summer vegetables and flowers, visitors and tourists come to connect to an urban green space. Named after a member of the Woo family that has leased the property to InterIm CDA since 1975, the garden is uniquely tied to the history of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean and other Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants who helped make Seattle the city it is today. Find out more about the history of this unique urban park.
Danny Woo Community Garden includes a special children’s garden, intended to engage youth in the community and provide an opportunity for elders to pass on their skills.

Danny Woo Community Garden

Seattle, WA

info@interimicda.org

(206) 624-1802

website / blog

facebook

The Danny Woo International District Community Garden is a special urban park in the heart of downtown Seattle, and the largest green space in the Chinatown/International District. The 1.5-acre garden provides community gardening space, picnic benches, public art, and walking trails. InterIm CDA manages this urban space, coordinating hundreds of volunteers every year to maintain and improve the Danny Woo Garden for everyone to enjoy.The Danny Woo Garden is located on the corner of Maynard Ave. and Main St.

The steeply terraced garden, surrounded with the lush greenery of bamboo and trees, is home to more than 100 community garden plots. Here elderly Asian gardeners tend to vegetables rarely seen in the typical grocery store, but which reflect their native lands: bok choy, bittermelon, daikon, and watercress. And younger generations of community gardeners experiment with plum trees, strawberries, beans, and herbs.

Residents come to plant summer vegetables and flowers, visitors and tourists come to connect to an urban green space. Named after a member of the Woo family that has leased the property to InterIm CDA since 1975, the garden is uniquely tied to the history of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean and other Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants who helped make Seattle the city it is today. Find out more about the history of this unique urban park.

Danny Woo Community Garden includes a special children’s garden, intended to engage youth in the community and provide an opportunity for elders to pass on their skills.

The UW Farm
Seattle, WA
uwfarm@uw.edu
website / blog
facebook
The UW Farm was started in 2004 with the goal of educating the University of Washington community about the global impacts of our food choices. The farm provides a model for reducing those impacts. The farm has been incorporated into the curriculum of classes ranging from ecology to anthropology and serves as a tool to connect the UW community with where and how food is grown.
The UW Farm has just begun a major site expansion on which it will work in partnership with Seattle Youth Garden Works.

The UW Farm

Seattle, WA

uwfarm@uw.edu

website / blog

facebook

The UW Farm was started in 2004 with the goal of educating the University of Washington community about the global impacts of our food choices. The farm provides a model for reducing those impacts. The farm has been incorporated into the curriculum of classes ranging from ecology to anthropology and serves as a tool to connect the UW community with where and how food is grown.

The UW Farm has just begun a major site expansion on which it will work in partnership with Seattle Youth Garden Works.

FareStart
700 Virginia Street
Seattle, WA 98101
info@farestart.org
(206) 443-1233
website
facebook
FareStart is a culinary job training and placement program for homeless and disadvantaged individuals. Over the past 19 years, FareStart has provided opportunities for nearly 3,500 people to transform their lives, while also serving over 4 million meals to disadvantaged men, women, and children.

FareStart

700 Virginia Street

Seattle, WA 98101

info@farestart.org

(206) 443-1233

website

facebook

FareStart is a culinary job training and placement program for homeless and disadvantaged individuals. Over the past 19 years, FareStart has provided opportunities for nearly 3,500 people to transform their lives, while also serving over 4 million meals to disadvantaged men, women, and children.

Food Not Bombs
Seattle, WA
seattlefoodnotbombs@hotmail.com
(206) 786-5397
website
facebook
Seattle Food Not Bombs is an all volunteer organization that strongly believes that food is a right and not a privilege and no matter who you are you should always have the right to eat! We have several different chapters and groups in the Seattle area, currently serving four times a week. We are always looking for volunteers with helping hands to come join us.

Food Not Bombs

Seattle, WA

seattlefoodnotbombs@hotmail.com

(206) 786-5397

website

facebook

Seattle Food Not Bombs is an all volunteer organization that strongly believes that food is a right and not a privilege and no matter who you are you should always have the right to eat! We have several different chapters and groups in the Seattle area, currently serving four times a week. We are always looking for volunteers with helping hands to come join us.

Alleycat Acres
1402 Third Ave, suite 403
Seattle, WA 98101
info@alleycatacres.com
(206) 395-8487
website
facebook


Alleycat Acres is a urban farming collective that aims to reconnect people with food. To achieve this, we create community-run farms on under utilized urban spaces.
By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.
Food is more than what we eat: it’s a medium through which we can forge intimate, meaningful relationships between people and place. Farming is a medium that reconnects us, both mentally and physically, to our surroundings. Our entire operation is based on the collective belief that urban food systems are key in creating healthy communities.
In an era where the automobile is king, we opt to use bikes as our mode of transportation. By challenging the existing paradigms around food production and transportation, we are creating alternative methods to show just how much can be accomplished when we collectively roll up our sleeves and work side by side.
Together, we can plant seeds of change.

Alleycat Acres currently operates a farm on Beacon Hill and one in the Central District.

Alleycat Acres

1402 Third Ave, suite 403

Seattle, WA 98101

info@alleycatacres.com

(206) 395-8487

website

facebook

Alleycat Acres is a urban farming collective that aims to reconnect people with food. To achieve this, we create community-run farms on under utilized urban spaces.

By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.

Food is more than what we eat: it’s a medium through which we can forge intimate, meaningful relationships between people and place. Farming is a medium that reconnects us, both mentally and physically, to our surroundings. Our entire operation is based on the collective belief that urban food systems are key in creating healthy communities.

In an era where the automobile is king, we opt to use bikes as our mode of transportation. By challenging the existing paradigms around food production and transportation, we are creating alternative methods to show just how much can be accomplished when we collectively roll up our sleeves and work side by side.

Together, we can plant seeds of change.

Alleycat Acres currently operates a farm on Beacon Hill and one in the Central District.

Urban Food Link
P.O. Box 99056
Seattle, WA 98139
tammy@urbanfoodlink.com
(206) 396-1276
website / blog
facebook

Urban Food Link partners with business, local government, and organizations working on community and neighborhood food planning. We provide technical assistance on an array of food projects in order to improve public health and build strong food communities with easy access to healthful food choices. With a focus on healthy school lunches, healthy retail food options, and public health and food issues, Urban Food Link is your resource for all things relating to good food, the community, and the building of sustainable food systems.

Urban Food Link

P.O. Box 99056

Seattle, WA 98139

tammy@urbanfoodlink.com

(206) 396-1276

website / blog

facebook

Urban Food Link partners with business, local government, and organizations working on community and neighborhood food planning. We provide technical assistance on an array of food projects in order to improve public health and build strong food communities with easy access to healthful food choices. With a focus on healthy school lunches, healthy retail food options, and public health and food issues, Urban Food Link is your resource for all things relating to good food, the community, and the building of sustainable food systems.

La Via Campesina North America
Headquartered in Washington DC
vianorteamerica@gmail.com
(202) 543-5675
website
facebook
Who is La Via Campesina?
We are the international movement of peasants, small- and medium-sized producers, landless, rural women, indigenous people, rural youth and agricultural workers. We defend the values and the basic interests of our members. We are an autonomous, pluralist and multicultural movement, independent of any political, economic, or other type of affiliation. Our 148 members are from 69 countries from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas.
How was La Via Campesina created?
In May of 1993, the First Conference of La Via Campesina was held in Mons, Belgium, where it was constituted as a world organization, and its first strategic guidelines and structure were defined. The Second International Conference was held in 1996 in Tlaxcala, Mexico; the third in 2000 in Bangalore, India; and the fourth in 2004 in Sao Paolo, Brazil.
What is our main objective?
The principal objective of La Via Campesina is to develop solidarity and unity among small farmer organizations in order to promote gender parity and social justice in fair economic relations; the preservation of land, water, seeds and other natural resources; food sovereignty; sustainable agricultural production based on small and medium-sized producers.
What do we defend?
Peasant, family farm-based production
La Via Campesina promotes a model of peasant or family-farm agriculture based on sustainable production with local resources and in harmony with local culture and traditions. Peasants and farmers rely on a long experience with their locallyavailable resources. We are capable of producing the optimal quantity and quality of food with few external inputs. Our production is mainly for family consumption and domestic markets.
People’s food sovereignty
Food sovereignty is the RIGHT of peoples, countries, and state unions to define their agricultural and food policy without the “dumping” of agricultural commodities into foreign countries. Food sovereignty organizes food production and consumption according to the needs of local communities, giving priority to production for local consumption. Food sovereignty includes the right to protect and regulate the national agricultural and livestock production and to shield the domestic market from the dumping of agricultural surpluses and low-price imports from other countries. Landless people, peasants, and small farmers must get access to land, water, and seed as well as productive resources and adequate public services. Food sovereignty and sustainability are a higher priority than trade policies.
Decentralized food production and supply chains
The current industrialized agribusiness model has been deliberately planned for the complete vertical integration and to dominate all agriculture activities. This model exploits workers and concentrates economic and political power. La Via Campesina advocates a decentralized model where production, processing, distribution and consumption are controlled by the people the communities themselves and not by transnational corporations.
Events
To globalize the struggle against injustice and neoliberalism worldwide, La Via Campesina has two important dates: 1. 17th of April: The international peasant struggle day People all around the world will commemorate the killing of 19 peasants struggling for land reform in Eldorado dos Carajas (Brazil) on April 17, 1996.

La Via Campesina North America

Headquartered in Washington DC

vianorteamerica@gmail.com

(202) 543-5675

website

facebook

Who is La Via Campesina?

We are the international movement of peasants, small- and medium-sized producers, landless, rural women, indigenous people, rural youth and agricultural workers. We defend the values and the basic interests of our members. We are an autonomous, pluralist and multicultural movement, independent of any political, economic, or other type of affiliation. Our 148 members are from 69 countries from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

How was La Via Campesina created?

In May of 1993, the First Conference of La Via Campesina was held in Mons, Belgium, where it was constituted as a world organization, and its first strategic guidelines and structure were defined. The Second International Conference was held in 1996 in Tlaxcala, Mexico; the third in 2000 in Bangalore, India; and the fourth in 2004 in Sao Paolo, Brazil.

What is our main objective?

The principal objective of La Via Campesina is to develop solidarity and unity among small farmer organizations in order to promote gender parity and social justice in fair economic relations; the preservation of land, water, seeds and other natural resources; food sovereignty; sustainable agricultural production based on small and medium-sized producers.

What do we defend?

Peasant, family farm-based production

La Via Campesina promotes a model of peasant or family-farm agriculture based on sustainable production with local resources and in harmony with local culture and traditions. Peasants and farmers rely on a long experience with their locallyavailable resources. We are capable of producing the optimal quantity and quality of food with few external inputs. Our production is mainly for family consumption and domestic markets.

People’s food sovereignty

Food sovereignty is the RIGHT of peoples, countries, and state unions to define their agricultural and food policy without the “dumping” of agricultural commodities into foreign countries. Food sovereignty organizes food production and consumption according to the needs of local communities, giving priority to production for local consumption. Food sovereignty includes the right to protect and regulate the national agricultural and livestock production and to shield the domestic market from the dumping of agricultural surpluses and low-price imports from other countries. Landless people, peasants, and small farmers must get access to land, water, and seed as well as productive resources and adequate public services. Food sovereignty and sustainability are a higher priority than trade policies.

Decentralized food production and supply chains

The current industrialized agribusiness model has been deliberately planned for the complete vertical integration and to dominate all agriculture activities. This model exploits workers and concentrates economic and political power. La Via Campesina advocates a decentralized model where production, processing, distribution and consumption are controlled by the people the communities themselves and not by transnational corporations.

Events

To globalize the struggle against injustice and neoliberalism worldwide, La Via Campesina has two important dates: 1. 17th of April: The international peasant struggle day People all around the world will commemorate the killing of 19 peasants struggling for land reform in Eldorado dos Carajas (Brazil) on April 17, 1996.

Fork + Frame
Seattle, WA
info@forkandframe.com
website
facebook
at fork + frame, we think bicycles are rad. we love to grub on fresh produce. and we are firmly rooted in our pursuit of food justice.
one night, we put our thinking caps on and came up with an idea: let’s work with a local farm to provide the first bike powered csa delivery service in seattle.
to us, it only came natural to collaborate with clean greens farm on this joint venture: we’re both rooted in the central district and we’re both are passionate about providing healthy, affordable food within the neighborhood we call home (plus, we’re all incredibly gorgeous).
we stand behind the mission of clean greens. we stand behind the use of bicycles within the city as an alternative mode of transportation. and pretty soon, we can be standing behind your door, with a fresh box of nom noms in tow.

Fork + Frame

Seattle, WA

info@forkandframe.com

website

facebook

at fork + frame, we think bicycles are rad. we love to grub on fresh produce. and we are firmly rooted in our pursuit of food justice.

one night, we put our thinking caps on and came up with an idea: let’s work with a local farm to provide the first bike powered csa delivery service in seattle.

to us, it only came natural to collaborate with clean greens farm on this joint venture: we’re both rooted in the central district and we’re both are passionate about providing healthy, affordable food within the neighborhood we call home (plus, we’re all incredibly gorgeous).

we stand behind the mission of clean greens. we stand behind the use of bicycles within the city as an alternative mode of transportation. and pretty soon, we can be standing behind your door, with a fresh box of nom noms in tow.

The Just Garden Project
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, suite 100,
Seattle, WA 98103
food@justgarden.org
(206) 708-9913
website
facebook
Mission
The Just Garden Projectis a grassroots organization dedicated to building a just food system and a culture of gardening for all people. We do this by building gardens, celebrating our community, educating new gardeners and training youth to take an active role in this transformation.
We are fiscally sponsored by Seattle Tilth.
Free/Subsidized Gardens
JGP builds free/subsidized gardensfor low income families in their homes. Each garden comes with 3 raised beds,soil, seeds, starts, a growing guide and a mentor. These gardens provide familiesand communities with self-sufficient access to highly nutritious, organic food.
Education
Through our mentor program, the Just Garden Project pairs new and seasoned gardeners. Mentors help new gardeners maximize their growing space and help them experience success in their first years of gardening.
Youth Engagement
Our work continues only if the next generations believe it is important. Partnering with existing youth organizations we educate and engage youth in the movement for just, healthy and thriving food systems. We engage youth in building gardens, visioning their food system and spreading the word about food justice.
Community Celebrations
How and what we celebrate says something about who we are. JGP organizes community celebrations around gardening. Throughout the year the
Just Garden Project has 4 main celebrations:
Our Launch Party
Spring Into Bed
Fall Into Bed
A Thanksgiving Feast

The Just Garden Project

4649 Sunnyside Ave N, suite 100,

Seattle, WA 98103

food@justgarden.org

(206) 708-9913

website

facebook

Mission

The Just Garden Projectis a grassroots organization dedicated to building a just food system and a culture of gardening for all people. We do this by building gardens, celebrating our community, educating new gardeners and training youth to take an active role in this transformation.

We are fiscally sponsored by Seattle Tilth.

Free/Subsidized Gardens

JGP builds free/subsidized gardensfor low income families in their homes. Each garden comes with 3 raised beds,soil, seeds, starts, a growing guide and a mentor. These gardens provide familiesand communities with self-sufficient access to highly nutritious, organic food.

Education

Through our mentor program, the Just Garden Project pairs new and seasoned gardeners. Mentors help new gardeners maximize their growing space and help them experience success in their first years of gardening.

Youth Engagement

Our work continues only if the next generations believe it is important. Partnering with existing youth organizations we educate and engage youth in the movement for just, healthy and thriving food systems. We engage youth in building gardens, visioning their food system and spreading the word about food justice.

Community Celebrations

How and what we celebrate says something about who we are. JGP organizes community celebrations around gardening. Throughout the year the

Just Garden Project has 4 main celebrations:

  • Our Launch Party
  • Spring Into Bed
  • Fall Into Bed
  • A Thanksgiving Feast
Clean Greens Farm and Market
116 21st Ave,
Seattle, WA 98122
cleangreensfarmandmarket@gmail.com
(206) 323-0534
website
facebook
Clean Greens Farm and Market was established to supply fresh, wholesome produce to families in need in Seattle’s Central District and other communities. Some of these communities do not have access to healthy produce, and are located in what is known as food deserts. Most residents in these areas have a higher rate of poor diet related illnesses such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. The number of obesity cases is also on the rise. Our market is committed to delivering quality produce to those families who otherwise would not have access to it.
Founded in 2007 by Rev. Robert L. Jeffrey, Sr., Clean Greens helps to educate our communities on healthy eating and food justice. We also offer affordable produce with our CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. Through this program, all residents are able to purchase fresh produce directly from a local farmer. Produce is often harvested the same day it is delivered. Also, through this program, we are able to build partnerships and forge meaningful relationships throughout our city and abroad.
Clean Greens grew out of the Black Dollar Days Task Force.

Clean Greens Farm and Market

116 21st Ave,

Seattle, WA 98122

cleangreensfarmandmarket@gmail.com

(206) 323-0534

website

facebook

Clean Greens Farm and Market was established to supply fresh, wholesome produce to families in need in Seattle’s Central District and other communities. Some of these communities do not have access to healthy produce, and are located in what is known as food deserts. Most residents in these areas have a higher rate of poor diet related illnesses such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. The number of obesity cases is also on the rise. Our market is committed to delivering quality produce to those families who otherwise would not have access to it.

Founded in 2007 by Rev. Robert L. Jeffrey, Sr., Clean Greens helps to educate our communities on healthy eating and food justice. We also offer affordable produce with our CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. Through this program, all residents are able to purchase fresh produce directly from a local farmer. Produce is often harvested the same day it is delivered. Also, through this program, we are able to build partnerships and forge meaningful relationships throughout our city and abroad.

Clean Greens grew out of the Black Dollar Days Task Force.

Seattle Youth Garden Works
3501 NE 41st St,
Seattle, WA 98195
sygw@seattletilth.org
(206) 633-0451
website
facebook
Seattle Youth Garden Works empowers homeless and under-served youth through garden-based education and employment. We are a market gardening program for youth ages 14-22 in the University District and South Park neighborhoods. Our goals are to connect youth to housing, health care, education, jobs and community.
Stop by our booth at the U-District Farmers Market on Saturdays from 9am-2pm!
SYGW recently became joined forces with Seattle Tilth. It is also beginning a major site expansion in collaboration with the UW Farm.

Seattle Youth Garden Works

3501 NE 41st St,

Seattle, WA 98195

sygw@seattletilth.org

(206) 633-0451

website

facebook

Seattle Youth Garden Works empowers homeless and under-served youth through garden-based education and employment. We are a market gardening program for youth ages 14-22 in the University District and South Park neighborhoods. Our goals are to connect youth to housing, health care, education, jobs and community.

Stop by our booth at the U-District Farmers Market on Saturdays from 9am-2pm!

SYGW recently became joined forces with Seattle Tilth. It is also beginning a major site expansion in collaboration with the UW Farm.

UW Student Food Cooperative
Seattle, WA
info@uwsfc.com
website / blog
facebook
We are building a student food cooperative whose purpose is to achieve food sovereignty on campus and address food justice issues through the affordable provision of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods that are ethically and sustainably grown and produced as well as locally sourced.
As a student run food cooperative working in tangent with the campus farm, students will engage with a localized and contextualized food system on campus through projects such as a bulk buying club, the farm itself, a CSA program, and the operation of the cooperative for food credit. Our initial ambition is to operate out of a small underutilized and little trafficked café space in the south of campus and sell prepared foods through a food cart on central campus.
Goals
Provide “real” food to students
Decrease the costs of food for students
Help educate students about the importance of their food choices and of the politics be-hind their food choices
Engender a culture of sustainability onto the UW campus
Promote the UW Farm and other local food producers practicing sustainable farming practices.
Enrich students with management skills in an enterprise where ethics, the environment, and social responsibility take precedence.
Provide educational opportunities around health and nutrition, sustainable food systems and global trade.
The Model
By decreasing overhead, the co-op incentivizes the eating of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods by making it affordable.
The produce used to make the food will be ethically and sustainably grown, produced and locally sourced.
The form of the cooperative will be a student run and operated café.
Organizational Structure
The organization will be governed and operated by existing students.
Student volunteers can take shifts at the co-op and will be compensated with food credit.
Commitment to Real Food and Sustainable Practices
We will use sustainable products through out the process of preparing the food and operating the cafe. We will facilitate a space for discussion and community around food and sustainable lifestyles.

UW Student Food Cooperative

Seattle, WA

info@uwsfc.com

website / blog

facebook

We are building a student food cooperative whose purpose is to achieve food sovereignty on campus and address food justice issues through the affordable provision of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods that are ethically and sustainably grown and produced as well as locally sourced.

As a student run food cooperative working in tangent with the campus farm, students will engage with a localized and contextualized food system on campus through projects such as a bulk buying club, the farm itself, a CSA program, and the operation of the cooperative for food credit. Our initial ambition is to operate out of a small underutilized and little trafficked café space in the south of campus and sell prepared foods through a food cart on central campus.

Goals

  • Provide “real” food to students
  • Decrease the costs of food for students
  • Help educate students about the importance of their food choices and of the politics be-hind their food choices
  • Engender a culture of sustainability onto the UW campus
  • Promote the UW Farm and other local food producers practicing sustainable farming practices.
  • Enrich students with management skills in an enterprise where ethics, the environment, and social responsibility take precedence.
  • Provide educational opportunities around health and nutrition, sustainable food systems and global trade.

The Model

  • By decreasing overhead, the co-op incentivizes the eating of healthy and organic high quality prepared foods by making it affordable.
  • The produce used to make the food will be ethically and sustainably grown, produced and locally sourced.
  • The form of the cooperative will be a student run and operated café.

Organizational Structure

  • The organization will be governed and operated by existing students.
  • Student volunteers can take shifts at the co-op and will be compensated with food credit.

Commitment to Real Food and Sustainable Practices

We will use sustainable products through out the process of preparing the food and operating the cafe. We will facilitate a space for discussion and community around food and sustainable lifestyles.

Danny Woo Community Garden
Seattle, WA
info@interimicda.org
(206) 624-1802
website / blog
facebook


The Danny Woo International District Community Garden is a special urban park in the heart of downtown Seattle, and the largest green space in the Chinatown/International District. The 1.5-acre garden provides community gardening space, picnic benches, public art, and walking trails. InterIm CDA manages this urban space, coordinating hundreds of volunteers every year to maintain and improve the Danny Woo Garden for everyone to enjoy.The Danny Woo Garden is located on the corner of Maynard Ave. and Main St.
The steeply terraced garden, surrounded with the lush greenery of bamboo and trees, is home to more than 100 community garden plots. Here elderly Asian gardeners tend to vegetables rarely seen in the typical grocery store, but which reflect their native lands: bok choy, bittermelon, daikon, and watercress. And younger generations of community gardeners experiment with plum trees, strawberries, beans, and herbs.
Residents come to plant summer vegetables and flowers, visitors and tourists come to connect to an urban green space. Named after a member of the Woo family that has leased the property to InterIm CDA since 1975, the garden is uniquely tied to the history of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean and other Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants who helped make Seattle the city it is today. Find out more about the history of this unique urban park.
Danny Woo Community Garden includes a special children’s garden, intended to engage youth in the community and provide an opportunity for elders to pass on their skills.

Danny Woo Community Garden

Seattle, WA

info@interimicda.org

(206) 624-1802

website / blog

facebook

The Danny Woo International District Community Garden is a special urban park in the heart of downtown Seattle, and the largest green space in the Chinatown/International District. The 1.5-acre garden provides community gardening space, picnic benches, public art, and walking trails. InterIm CDA manages this urban space, coordinating hundreds of volunteers every year to maintain and improve the Danny Woo Garden for everyone to enjoy.The Danny Woo Garden is located on the corner of Maynard Ave. and Main St.

The steeply terraced garden, surrounded with the lush greenery of bamboo and trees, is home to more than 100 community garden plots. Here elderly Asian gardeners tend to vegetables rarely seen in the typical grocery store, but which reflect their native lands: bok choy, bittermelon, daikon, and watercress. And younger generations of community gardeners experiment with plum trees, strawberries, beans, and herbs.

Residents come to plant summer vegetables and flowers, visitors and tourists come to connect to an urban green space. Named after a member of the Woo family that has leased the property to InterIm CDA since 1975, the garden is uniquely tied to the history of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean and other Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants who helped make Seattle the city it is today. Find out more about the history of this unique urban park.

Danny Woo Community Garden includes a special children’s garden, intended to engage youth in the community and provide an opportunity for elders to pass on their skills.

The UW Farm
Seattle, WA
uwfarm@uw.edu
website / blog
facebook
The UW Farm was started in 2004 with the goal of educating the University of Washington community about the global impacts of our food choices. The farm provides a model for reducing those impacts. The farm has been incorporated into the curriculum of classes ranging from ecology to anthropology and serves as a tool to connect the UW community with where and how food is grown.
The UW Farm has just begun a major site expansion on which it will work in partnership with Seattle Youth Garden Works.

The UW Farm

Seattle, WA

uwfarm@uw.edu

website / blog

facebook

The UW Farm was started in 2004 with the goal of educating the University of Washington community about the global impacts of our food choices. The farm provides a model for reducing those impacts. The farm has been incorporated into the curriculum of classes ranging from ecology to anthropology and serves as a tool to connect the UW community with where and how food is grown.

The UW Farm has just begun a major site expansion on which it will work in partnership with Seattle Youth Garden Works.

FareStart
700 Virginia Street
Seattle, WA 98101
info@farestart.org
(206) 443-1233
website
facebook
FareStart is a culinary job training and placement program for homeless and disadvantaged individuals. Over the past 19 years, FareStart has provided opportunities for nearly 3,500 people to transform their lives, while also serving over 4 million meals to disadvantaged men, women, and children.

FareStart

700 Virginia Street

Seattle, WA 98101

info@farestart.org

(206) 443-1233

website

facebook

FareStart is a culinary job training and placement program for homeless and disadvantaged individuals. Over the past 19 years, FareStart has provided opportunities for nearly 3,500 people to transform their lives, while also serving over 4 million meals to disadvantaged men, women, and children.

Food Not Bombs
Seattle, WA
seattlefoodnotbombs@hotmail.com
(206) 786-5397
website
facebook
Seattle Food Not Bombs is an all volunteer organization that strongly believes that food is a right and not a privilege and no matter who you are you should always have the right to eat! We have several different chapters and groups in the Seattle area, currently serving four times a week. We are always looking for volunteers with helping hands to come join us.

Food Not Bombs

Seattle, WA

seattlefoodnotbombs@hotmail.com

(206) 786-5397

website

facebook

Seattle Food Not Bombs is an all volunteer organization that strongly believes that food is a right and not a privilege and no matter who you are you should always have the right to eat! We have several different chapters and groups in the Seattle area, currently serving four times a week. We are always looking for volunteers with helping hands to come join us.

Alleycat Acres
1402 Third Ave, suite 403
Seattle, WA 98101
info@alleycatacres.com
(206) 395-8487
website
facebook


Alleycat Acres is a urban farming collective that aims to reconnect people with food. To achieve this, we create community-run farms on under utilized urban spaces.
By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.
Food is more than what we eat: it’s a medium through which we can forge intimate, meaningful relationships between people and place. Farming is a medium that reconnects us, both mentally and physically, to our surroundings. Our entire operation is based on the collective belief that urban food systems are key in creating healthy communities.
In an era where the automobile is king, we opt to use bikes as our mode of transportation. By challenging the existing paradigms around food production and transportation, we are creating alternative methods to show just how much can be accomplished when we collectively roll up our sleeves and work side by side.
Together, we can plant seeds of change.

Alleycat Acres currently operates a farm on Beacon Hill and one in the Central District.

Alleycat Acres

1402 Third Ave, suite 403

Seattle, WA 98101

info@alleycatacres.com

(206) 395-8487

website

facebook

Alleycat Acres is a urban farming collective that aims to reconnect people with food. To achieve this, we create community-run farms on under utilized urban spaces.

By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.

Food is more than what we eat: it’s a medium through which we can forge intimate, meaningful relationships between people and place. Farming is a medium that reconnects us, both mentally and physically, to our surroundings. Our entire operation is based on the collective belief that urban food systems are key in creating healthy communities.

In an era where the automobile is king, we opt to use bikes as our mode of transportation. By challenging the existing paradigms around food production and transportation, we are creating alternative methods to show just how much can be accomplished when we collectively roll up our sleeves and work side by side.

Together, we can plant seeds of change.

Alleycat Acres currently operates a farm on Beacon Hill and one in the Central District.

Urban Food Link
P.O. Box 99056
Seattle, WA 98139
tammy@urbanfoodlink.com
(206) 396-1276
website / blog
facebook

Urban Food Link partners with business, local government, and organizations working on community and neighborhood food planning. We provide technical assistance on an array of food projects in order to improve public health and build strong food communities with easy access to healthful food choices. With a focus on healthy school lunches, healthy retail food options, and public health and food issues, Urban Food Link is your resource for all things relating to good food, the community, and the building of sustainable food systems.

Urban Food Link

P.O. Box 99056

Seattle, WA 98139

tammy@urbanfoodlink.com

(206) 396-1276

website / blog

facebook

Urban Food Link partners with business, local government, and organizations working on community and neighborhood food planning. We provide technical assistance on an array of food projects in order to improve public health and build strong food communities with easy access to healthful food choices. With a focus on healthy school lunches, healthy retail food options, and public health and food issues, Urban Food Link is your resource for all things relating to good food, the community, and the building of sustainable food systems.

About:


A directory of food-based and food-related organizing in Seattle. This site catalogs regional efforts to craft a more just society through food and acts as a virtual hub for connecting diverse strands of the food movement.

If you know of a food/justice organization missing from this space, let us know.



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